Racial Affliations
April 13, 2005

The recent dust kicked up over the Conservative Brotherhood has seen some rather interesting commentary. There are some who feel race and politics are in no way correlated. As usual, notions of a colorblind society have been brought into the fray. Can I just interject how completely idiotic I find the idea that we are supposed to walk around the Earth and not see each other's differences? God's no fool. He knew what He was doing. I linked to much of the commentary on Monday, but yesterday, I received the following email and found it accurate to say the least:

From: A Reader
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2005
Subject: Re: Racial Affiliations

Good topic...The comments here (and on other Web sies) have only reinforced my opinion that the issue of race, and not Iraq, is the true quagmire America is stuck in today. The issue is of great personal significance to me since my wife and I are of different races, and we are expecting our first child in a few months. I dread the thought of our child becoming a pawn in the political war being waged, especially for goals and reasons that long ago were forgotten.

The battlelines keep shifting in this quagmire. Alliances formed today are broken tomorrow and reformed anew the following day. The defintion of racism seems to change periodically and without warning. There is a lot of rhetoric about "us" versus "them". Just who is this "us", and who are "them"? How can my wife and I explain this to our child? What are the goals in this battle?

Perhaps we should start holding the generals in this war accountable, namely the politicians, civil rights leaders, and journalists. Should they not at least try to explain to us what they are doing? If they can't, why should we continue to follow them?

Yesterday, Townhall's weblog analyzed Washington Post columnist William Raspberry's most recent column on closing the gap between blacks and whites.

To a large degree, various pockets of American people refuse to properly address our country's racial tension. It's present in the Church, education, government, and Conservatives in particular, often fail to note the specific attention needed in the area of black/white relations. The history of communication there is not good. There's too much hypersensitivity on both ends. It's a counter productive way to communicate.

At this point, I'm more interested in reading what other people have to say, particularly in regards to this email.

Posted by Ambra at April 13, 2005 12:45 AM in Race
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Do you think it's really the conservatives at fault today? I see black leaders like Al Sharpton and Kweisi Mfune doing more harm to blacks than conservatives ever do. Articulate, intelligent blacks such as Condoleezza Rice are smeared by liberals and ignored by black leaders who do not appreciate successful black conservatives.

P.S. The "dust kicked up" link is broken.

...and Conservatives in particular,often fail to note the specific attention needed in the area of black/white relations.

Exactly. The black/white problem is the crux IMHO of the racial problem in America. To many times it is thought that by the 'Powers That Be' that if you stick a (non-white male) face on an issue of you handle a situation 'Multi culturally' The problem is solved. (Goes for Lib & Cons). But there is a specific history between whites and blacks in America that has yet to be properly addressed. It must be addressed specifically. I'll spell it out. When you enslave and then oppress a people for 4 centuries its gonna take more than 40 years to let that stuff go.

Here's one anecdotal perspective:

My wife and I are from different racial backgrounds, but we were both born in this country. My genetic background is English-Welsh with a touch of German. My wife was adopted as an infant, and her genetic background is unknown, except that she is the biological daughter of an interracial couple (African-American father and Caucasian mother). In appearance, she has been perceived as everything from Italian to Hispanic to Peruvian. Her adoptive father was African-American and her adoptive mother is from Haiti.

What we have found interesting is that -- in one very important respect -- we come from very similar family backgrounds. My mother was British and Anglican, and she maintained her British identity and accent throughout her life in this country. Similarly, my wife's adoptive mother is an Episcopalian from Haiti, and she has maintained her Haitian identity and accent while living in this country.

So, my wife and I each come from homes where our mother was a foreign national, with similar religious backgrounds, and our father was an American. That commonality in upbringing has given us a firm basis for our relationship that has strongly outweighed our racial differences.

After more than twenty years of marriage in the midwest, we have never experienced any direct discrimination or harassment based on race. Nor have our children. But we have also raised our children in the context of a strong Christian church, so that may have precluded a great deal of problems.

Having lived as part of an interracial couple, raising interracial children in the Midwest, my perspective on race-relations boils down to culture. I think the idea of a colorblind society is an exercise in denial of the obvious. Although we are all equally members of the human race, it is also true that differences in culture are often related to differences in appearance and behavior. People tend to group themselves according to their similarities. The resulting differences in culture provide different strengths and weaknesses for the people in those cultures.

The task, as I see it, is to find ways for people from different cultural backgrounds to cooperate so that the strengths of each culture are made effective parts of our overall community.

We need each other, and we have much to learn from each other. But a "colorblind" approach to our cultural differences denies us access to the very thing we need to get stronger as a nation.

By way of an analogy, a "colorblind" approach to building community is rather like a "position-blind" approach to building a football team. When you take that approach, your success will be based on the random chance that someone suited to a position ends up actually playing that position. I think it's better to make an effort to evaluate each player's strengths and weaknesses and have them play on the team in positions that draw upon their strengths.

So, given your first-hand knowledge of your own racial/cultural background, how would you describe the strengths and weaknesses of that racial/cultural heritage?

Ambra,
I comment here (and at LB) only occasionally and on very select topics. The e-mail you posted strikes a chord because of my own inter-racial marriage and its unique challenges. The "world" is going to do what it's always done (ie; that is, "only get worse", per God's word). Thus, my focus is primarily on trying to make a difference in Christ's church (which presents more than enough challenge to last a lifetime). And I know God has me doing exactly His purpose (He's also given me pretty good "funk bass" guitar playing skills which has opened many doors that would otherwise be closed to a fair-haired boy like me!). Ultimately, Satan's entire purpose is to seperate us from God - his ultimate weapon is to keep us seperated through hate and distrust. Jesus Christ is the only solution for that.

growing up in Pennsylvania and then spending my college years seeing the often black homeless didn't really set me up for a healthy subconscious picture of other races, so i come to this topic with a great many more questions than answers. my family, has always tried to show love and openness to people of any background, but i just didn't have many positive interactions with people who weren't white. all the while, i was told by some of the more vocal voices that i should feel guilt for the actions of ancestors i never knew or supported in their hateful actions. though i now understand the reasoning, it felt like a stranger was coming up to me on the street, slapping me on the face and telling me to apologize for the person who lived two floors down in my apartment building.

now thankfully, the influence of my parents and God's call to love other people more than myself worked in, over and around the negative influences in my life. i have had a number of friends from differing racial backgrounds and i try to be aware of any subtle discrimination in my life.

i guess i look back on my early life and wonder "what could have been done better?" one thing is that i could have used more times with my community of faith that broke racial barriers. that's certain. i could have also used more times when my family intentionally befriended people different from us and invited them home for supper. these are some of the things that as future conservative parent i hope to pursue more.

in the mean time, i wonder if we don't also need some wiser spokespeople to step up. i am continually amazed that so many people speak on an issue only in the style they are comfortable. it is somehow assumed that those who disagree will magically be convinced.

where are the people who will learn to speak the cultural lingo of other groups and learn to speak in meaningful ways to other communities? i know there are some out there, but i think they're few and far in between. no matter how much we desire it, our detractors in any cause will not come to us. we must go to them, share our frustration in different ways that target that audience and present solutions that are reasonable steps along the path to our ultimate goal. i didn't see much of that growing up.

In my experience, the white/black issue is most important on the east coast and in the south. In the midwest, there is more white/hispanic tension. In the west, there is way more black/hispanic violence than any other kind.

Now, I admit that my experience doesn't run the gamut; these are just personal observations. But race relations in the US are more complex than just the black/white issue. And it doesn't help that the loudest voices are almost always the most fringe.

I know that the blacks I am aquainted with (I admit, I don't know that many black people)want nothing more than what I want: a fair chance at achieving their goals.

At the risk of seeming impertinent, or dismissive of the comments above (which I actually find quite worthy of attention), may I suggest taking a look at Galatians 3:27-29?

Laserlawyer, you have been truly blessed, I think, to have lived outside of the influence of direct racism for so long.

In reference to the original e-mail, I don't think that the definition of racism ever changes. There will always be those who dislike other based on the color of their skin. Aside from the fact that we are born in sin, some expressions of sin are taught to us by our parents, our friends, our teachers, and society. I didn't know that I wasn't supposed to be playing with the White kid down the street until my friends told me so. I didn't know that I "spoke White" until my "friends" told me so.

The so-called leaders we have in this country do nothing to halt racisim, in fact doing everything they can to fan the fire. It's still true that many don't get a fair shake. the solution isn't to give others a bigger advantage though, because that merely heightens resentment. One of the bigest pieces to the solution puzzle is to stop blaming each other for our woes, even when the blame has some merit. There are too many ways that people can forge a good living in this country to blame every problem on somebody else.

Having grown up in Western PA, an absolute bastion of ethnic hatred, (I've had my share of beatings) I'm not speaking from a position of idealism. Hatred enjoys company. Love and responsibility often stand seemingly alone.

Ambra, I hope you won't mind me pointing out that I recently put together a piece on racism on my site. I don't mean to parasitize your site, it's just that I don't believe in coincidence. If you go to the "Say What Now?" page of my website and scroll down to April 7, I think you'll find it interesting.

Take care,
M

For Mike:

Gal 3:27-29 is great for those who are in Christ. And certainly, the followers of Christ could and should do more to live out those verses. But the racial tensions in this country are not limited to relationships among those who are in Christ. The resolution of those tensions will require more than simply calling Christ-followers to obedience amongst themselves. It will necessarily require addressing relationships of all kinds.

I hate to admit it, but sometimes I feel like I experience more discrimination from my own ethnic groups. I’m half Hispanic, and half Native American, and both sides of the family accuse me of acting white. When I was younger, I had erroneously assumed that my family would be proud of me for putting myself through college and getting a decent job. Instead, I learned firsthand about crab mentality. If through hard work and perseverance a person starts to get ahead, friends and relatives go out of their way to try to pull you back down. If my behavior deviates from what them deem to be the norm, I’m called a race traitor and all sorts of vile names. I’m not so naïve as to believe that if we just all hold hands and sing Kumbaya that all racial tensions will mystically and magically go away. But until we’re willing to solve the problems within our own communities, I fear we’re never going to make progress.

The point I was trying to get across is that it isn't important--well, maybe better to say it shouldn't be important--what color God painted you, or anyone else.

Michael wrote: "Do you think it's really the conservatives at fault today?"

Ambra wrote: Nope. I think it's everyone's fault.

Parke wrote: "i guess i look back on my early life and wonder "what could have been done better?" one thing is that i could have used more times with my community of faith that broke racial barriers. that's certain."

Ambra wrote: Agreed. I consistently contend that the color barrier will only be broken in/through/by the body of Christ. That's the only place I've experienced it. We've done a poor job modeling this unfortunately.

Parke wrote: "Where are the people who will learn to speak the cultural lingo of other groups and learn to speak in meaningful ways to other communities?"

Ambra wrote: Good question Parke. I think one thing Americans are good for is the messiah complex and the superiority complex. When we go on "missions trips" we view it as a give-give situation instead of give-take. We think other people need us more than we need them.

When it comes to reaching out across cultures in America, white people especially need to lose the "We have all the answers and we're going to help you help yourselves" mentality. Nobody is Michelle Pfeifer here and this ain't Dangerous Minds. It's an inaccurate perspective on the world. The "White equals best or better" philosophy as a few have pointed out is hurting America. Americans in general expect every person who comes to this country to act like us because after all, we're better.

This is the type of environment we supposedly want to build relationship in and it's not working. There has to be a mutual understanding between cultures that each has something that the other needs.

Mark: You've earned a good reputation here. I will certainly take a look at your piece later on today.

Esperanza wrote:"When I was younger, I had erroneously assumed that my family would be proud of me for putting myself through college and getting a decent job. Instead, I learned firsthand about crab mentality."

Ambra wrote: Interesting. I actually planned to write about the crabpot later this week.

flaime wrote: "In my experience, the white/black issue is most important on the east coast and in the south. In the midwest, there is more white/hispanic tension. In the west, there is way more black/hispanic violence than any other kind."

Ambra wrote: You're right. It varies from region to region. But I think the black/white issues pans America. It's not so much about where there's the most violence but where there is the most tension (spoken and unspoken). You'll notice on this very email I posted, few will comment out of fear for how they'll be labeled. It's a hypersensitive topic.

When it comes to matters of race, I prefer the South. Why? Because at least they they're honest about their bigotry. Up here in the Northwest, people smile in your face and despise you in their heart. I say the latter is worse.

Mike wrote: "The point I was trying to get across is that it isn't important--well, maybe better to say it shouldn't be important--what color God painted you, or anyone else."

Ambra wrote: I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. I think it is absolutely important what color God painted you. He did so for a reason that is directly linked to your purpose on the earth.

When racism in the church is truly addressed, like Fred Price tried to do and was slapped around for by some white evangelicals, the broader U.S. community will be able to address it. Until then, nothing is going to happen.

Something is wrong when CeCe Winans has to change her style to get more white audiences to listen to her music.

Something is wrong when people point out the Black OOW birth rate and then blame it on Black churches, instead of looking at the OOW sex
rate, then finding out most whites AND Blacks have had OOW sex before the age of 21 and focusing on that for a bit. OOW births are not the
sin. OOW sex is the sin. So if the Black church is having a problem, so is the white church. That means the church is having a problem.

Feel me?

Ambra, you're on fire now!!!!!!!

Sorry.

Now THAT'LL PREACH!

DS,
I feel you - (and feel racial tension) smack dab in the middle of "addressing" God's purpose for me in His church. Getting slapped doing God's will is not color exclusive. Anyone doing the slapping in God's church is definitely not "of" His church. Just patheic hypocrites

As for CeCe, I would venture a guess that she would say it's God Himself "ordering her steps" on how she sings for Him, first and foremost.

Yes, this is an interesting and touchy subject, but strangely- and thankfully- one that I personally feel no stress over. My ethnicity is Mexican, and I was raised in a military, mixed-race family. I know my parents got the hurtful comments from some in their families (on my stepdad's side, some weren't happy that he didn't marry a black woman, and on my mom's side, some weren't thrilled that she married a black man), but I never heard anything mean myself. In fact, when we were stationed in Japan, we used to get comments from the locals about what a beautiful family we were. Go figure.
Now, I'm married to my sweetie, who's white...and *all* of my friends and close relatives are married to someone of a different ethnicity. Every single couple I know is a mixed couple, so it's beyond normal to me. I understand that other people think it's less than ideal, or unusual, but I don't care.
As a believer, it's easy to see the enemy's handiwork in hatred of all kinds.
(sorry for the long post, ambra)

The problem with your supposition BH is that I've never enslaved anybody. I am not to blame for slavery. If I was alive in 1860 I'd be just as anti-slavery as I am anti-abortion today.

When you stand before the throne, there is only One who can stand with you.

DarkStar: Yea, it's white people's fault. Yada, Yada, Yada. White folks fidgit in church when the preacher goes past 12:01, blacks jump and shout all day. That's OK. Racial (read cultural) differences are OK. My point is, in the grand scheme, what does it matter?

Mike: [b]THANK YOU![/b] You've solved the problem of race.

To the anonymous e-mailer: You must do what you believe is the right thing to do.

I grew up colorblind. I am white and my wife is black. We are raising our children to be colorblind. We all refuse to be classified by race. Lord willing, my children will raise their children to be colorblind.

I know not what others may do, but as for my family...

Ambra, sorry for so many posts, but this is important to me, I feel compelled to respond.

Don't mistake "white superiority" with American culture. There is a reason that America is the richest, freest country in the history of the world. I believe that there are two reasons: 1. Our founding fathers made a covenant with God. 2. Individual rights.

As for God's purpose in creating race, I point you to the Tower of Babel. Will we ever really understand each other?

God isn't colorblind and we shouldn't be either. Ambra said it well with this:

Ambra wrote: I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. I think it is absolutely important what color God painted you. He did so for a reason that is directly linked to your purpose on the earth.

The thing is to appreciate each other's cultural and colorful differences for what they are, while not elevating them to where they influence how you feel about an entire group of people. Not even one's own.

Colorblindness would just be another blindness, and I'm tired of being overlooked.

Why force me to "appreciate" a culture that I despise? Tis better to acknowledge the Rights of Man and move on.

Red, Yellow, Black, White... must we go back to Sunday School to see the truth that is right before our face? God is no respecter of man. I doubt the angels sing many "black is beautiful" songs.

Let's see if I can't close that tag.

That didn't work. Oh well.

While I celebrate my African heritage, I am not one that digs this artificial barrier of 'race'. One race. Human. Different skin/eye colours, body shapes, hair textures, languages, cultures et cetra, et cetera, but one 'race'. America never has been colour blind and I doubt I'll see it become so in my (limited) lifetime. I also don't give a fig.

I am called to love God with everything and everyone else as myself. the first part is easy, the second part not so. Well, not so on a purely physical/sensual level. It took me a few years to recognize that I was enjoined to love the part of everybody else that I had in common with them--their spirit.

The spirit is the essence of humanity. The spirit is what is capable of connecting/communing with God. When I received the revelation that I was to love spirit to spirit, what a person looked/sounded/acted like made so much less of a difference. I had something in common with them, whether or not they believed or looked or acted as I did (or wanted them to). I learned to love their potential.

As a result, the racial thing is no longer an issue for me. Physically and culturally I am what I am. That makes me no better or worse than anyone else. I endeavor to love the most important part of them, the very essence of them. I tell you, it has uncomplicated my life and my dealings with people.

The thing is we CAN come together. Basically folks want the same things. I believe that if we treat each other the way we wish to be treated the artificial barriers that prevent us from enjoying the richness of all humanity will come crashing down. That is my dream. It doesn't matter to me if I never have the pleasure of seeing it fulfilled in my lifetime. I never intend to wake up from it.

One of the difficult paradoxes of race
is how to appreciate and even celebrate cultural differences, while at the same time respecting the individual by not stereotyping or ascribing all of the characteristics of the group onto the individual.

I think I'll just let Nick Lowe (via Elvis Costello) speak for me on this issue:

(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding

written by Nick Lowe

As I walk through
This wicked world
Searchin' for light in the darkness of insanity...

I ask myself
Is all hope lost?
Is there only pain and hatred, and misery?

And each time I feel like this inside,
There's one thing I wanna know:
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding? Ohhhh
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding?

And as I walked on
Through troubled times
My spirit gets so downhearted sometimes!
So where are the strong?
And who are the trusted?
And where is the harmony?
Sweet harmony!

'Cause each time I feel it slippin' away, just makes me wanna cry...
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding? Ohhhh
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding?


So where are the strong?
And who are the trusted?
And where is the harmony?
Sweet harmony!

'Cause each time I feel it slippin' away, just makes me wanna cry...
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding? Ohhhh
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding? Ohhhh
What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding?

*just a lil something to chew on...Peace*

the calssic sunday school song says it best:

"red and yello, black, and white, they are precious in His sight...."

all the different colors, races, ethnicities, created by God as each unique and wonderful and made in His image.

our attempts to merge everyone into one shade or grey is sad, boring, and dare i say it, unGodly...maybe stretching it a bit but hey, i'm not color blind, i'm color appreciative (guess that's how i'd say it)

I'm totally for anyone marrying anyone--it breaks down barriers. I grew up in an area where different ethnicities/"colors" dated, and there was a conscious effort at integration. I like variety--I even go to a predominantly non-American church, and our denomination's regional head is black, and he's into fighting racism. He suggested the book "Divided by Faith."

What I don't like is being falsely accused ad nauseum for everything under the sun because of my skin color. That's when the diversity is perverted.

As for CeCe, I would venture a guess that she would say it's God
Himself "ordering her steps" on how she sings for Him, first and
foremost.

She said that she changed her style for the reason I gave.

Yea, it's white people's fault. Yada, Yada, Yada.

Do yourself a favor and look up what Fred Price had to say.

When I mentioned OOW births and sex, I was refering to something Jesse
Lee Peterson said. He's Black if you didn't know.

I didn't "blame the white man".

So, not to disappoint you, what does A.M.E. stand for and why does it exist?

Now do you feel better Stevie?

I'll answer these comments in my next post.

You do not need to hate someone to kill him, or love him to let him live.
You do not need to be black to sell me a car or white to fix my air conditioning.
Be nice.

DarkStar: I invite you to attend a few black churches and sample some of the "nice" things that they have to say about white people. Now I'm begining to understand why so many black people reject colorblindness? Could be.

As for how me, "I Feel Fine" (Cream is reuniting for 4 shows in London!)

I invite you to attend a few black churches and sample some of the "nice" things that they have to say about white people.

Of the many Black churches I've been in, they don't say a d**n thing about white people. They are too busy trying, with some pretending, to get their praise on.

Now, answer this very simple question: Why does the A.M.E. church exist?

I would suspect that it was created because of racism in the regular Methodist church. Life stinks. What's your point?

Go to more churches. (Especially around election time)

If not us, who? If not now, when? I'm tellin' ya, God respects no color.

I would suspect that it was created because of racism in the regular Methodist church. Life stinks. What's your point?

Hatred in the Body of Christ shouldn't exist but did and does. So, to use your words, in that case, Yea, it's white people's fault.

Go to more churches. (Especially around election time)

You go to more instead of believing sterotypes.

Did you look up Fred Price yet?

Dark Star, even though I think you probably already know the answer, the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.)Church was founded because of racism. In 1787 worshippers at the St. George United Methodist Church in Philadelphia, PA, were actually accosted during prayer. As a result of this, Richard Allen, a free Black Man, founded the Free African Society, which later became the A. M. E. Church. If memory serves me correctly, the first General Conference of A.M.E.s was held in 1816.

Steven, please don't paint all Blacks with that same broad brush. That suggests to me that you have an issue with Blacks. Being married to a Black woman doesn't exempt you from that. While I am at it, which culture do you 'despise'? Why? I may not want to be Amish, but I sure don't despise them. Going back and reading your statements makes me believe you are somewhat bigoted. If I am wrong, I apologize, but I am just reading what you are writing.

Was it Martin Luther King, Jr. that said eleven o'clock on Sunday ws the most segregated time in America? Racism in the church in America exists. I have been a member of Black and multi-cultural churches. I have never seen an instance of racism in a Black church, no did I see it in the multi-cultural congregation. However, when I was in the military (Iwakuni, Japan), we had a predominately Black chapel service at 12:00, the 'Gospel Hour'. A few of the White parishioners (abetted by a few of the chaplains) screamed and howled because our worship was different from theirs. Nevermind that most of us that attended the 12:00 service also attended the earlier service. Nevermind that we didn't try to change their style of worship. We just desired a freer expression of our faith. It got so bad that we were accused of trying to start a church! Shoot, we were just having church.

We didn't need validation, but it came when one of the White woman who attended both services told us that she was grateful for us because we had shown her it was okay to be free in worshipping God. She said her worship life had been changed forever. For me, that made all of the sniping against us worth it.

Wow, DarkStar! You've found Christians being imperfect. Who knew! Care to extend that imperfectness to black Christians? You may be surprised to find that any grouping of people mess up. (If you want me to read the Price piece, give me a link, but is Price - like Tony Snow and Michael Steele - Gospel?)

As soon as you criticize black racism as much as you criticize white racism - come talk. Until that time, I question...

Rafael: I try to paint nobody with too broad a brush. Human beings can be generalized into many groups, take it as that but try to size-up a man based on the individual.

My belief in colorblindness gets criticized and now you want to call me a bigot? All cultures (and groups of people) can be criticized.

Further addressing another of Ambra's points, while I guess it is true that white people "created" the principals of the free market and indivualism as know in American culture, white people also created Marxism, Socialism and cell phones (I HATE cell-phones!)

Mexican culture is inferior to American culture. I despise the Indian culture of the "Untouchable." We are at war with an Islamic culture which despises freedom and indivuality.

Certain white religious denominations are only now trying to fully integrate blacks and other into their worldview. Since it's 2005, one is forced to ask: "What took so long!?"

Steven,
It appears as if the boom has been dropped on you. Your comment that incorporated the word "despise" seems to have invalidated everything else you expounded on (and I'm not sure even I understood your intent of that point). However, for anyone to have never witnessed a single incident of racism in a Black church is very fortunate (maybe it correlates to the culture perspective one comes from). I witness it "frequently" including (and especially) from the pulpit. If some of what I've heard were said in a White church it would be on the local news by the end of the day. The message is, "I'm white (thus guilty at birth), take it or leave outta here." Well, I go where God leads, according to "His" purpose (and prayerfully to make a "dent of difference" for the better).

Okay, I think I've had quite enough of this fruitless back and forth.

Comments closed until the next post on the matter.

Aw man, you missed your chance!
{ Comments are now closed for this entry. }




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Reflections on the Ill-Read Society
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The Double-Minded Haters
Hindsight
Hip-Hop in Education: Do You Wanna Revolution?
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